Thursday, March 01, 2007

An X-Rated Classroom Somewhere: No porn left behind

A barrage of lewd images usually is a good thing. But not if you're a substitute teacher who pulled up a little Internet surprise with the morning lesson plan.

As I digested the news story, my reactions were all over the map:

- 40 possible years in prison - yikes! (and many human rights activists agree: http://www.alternet.org/rights/46925/)

- In this age of spyware, who among us haven't fallen victim to those nefarious popups? Or typed whitehouse.com rather than whitehouse.gov?

- Sweet Lincoln's mullet, why didn't she toss her coat or a blanket over the monitor?

- Although it's not like kids these days are delicate flowers in need of cloister. Eight-year-olds have probably seen things on Myspace that would make me blush.

- "The students were using the Internet to search hair styles"

...WAIT A MINUTE. Now I find that even more disturbing. Unless this was history class, and the hair style search involved how elaborate wigs and other frivolities by Court of Versailles inspired the French Revolution, I don't think googling hair styles is appropriate book learning for our tax dollars and future generations.

2 Comments:

At 8:34 PM, Blogger Needtsza said...

I'd counter by suing the school system for not making such sites unavailable, such as Montgomery County Schools have done.

If they're so f'n worried about safeguarding their children, then they really should do something about securing their own network.

I agree that a harmless typing error that causes a pop-up should not be held against the individual.

Meanwhile, this is such an easy case. That is, if it was an isolated incident and that can be proved by the log of what the substitute logged onto that day.

That sub should get off easy but prolly won't. Sux!

 
At 9:03 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Just take a survey to see how many of those kids saw "Jackass 2". I thought I would take my seventh grader to it with me there, so I could monitor it. I was amazed to be the only adult in the theater. Most were my kids age, and parents walked them in to give permission to attend, then left.

And yes, I agree with needtsza, schools have the ability to block myspace, they have the ability to block this also.

 

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